This is the sight landholders want to halt by raising the price on the head of wild dogs.
This is the sight landholders want to halt by raising the price on the head of wild dogs.

Wild dog trapper offers services

AN experienced dog-trapper, tired of wild dogs killing livestock in frenzied attacks has put up his hand to help Southern Downs landholders.

Peter Lincoln owns the Brisbane-based business Get Trapped, a major supplier to government agencies involved in pest control in Queensland and New South Wales.

This week he praised moves by the Southern Downs Regional Council to lift the bounty on wild dogs from $50 to $100.

He said the increase, which would help compensate land holders who trapped dogs, may have another benefit.

“I think the rise in bounty may also lure some professional or recreational shooters and trappers into the area to lend a hand,” Mr Lincoln said.

“There are some very experienced, very responsible shooters and trappers out there whose input could help make a difference.

“Having a wild dog problem is very stressful. It costs you sleep and time as well as money.

“So, many landholders may appreciate some outside help and support.”

Mr Lincoln said he was prepared to liaise with landholders interested in allowing recreational shooters or trappers on to their property.

He was also prepared to travel to properties to help those interested in learning more about setting wild dog traps.

“The wild dog problem is right across Queensland, and I know there are several shires that employ a full-time trapper to help keep on top of the problem,” Mr Lincoln said.

“As someone who has spent a lot of time in the Southern Downs area and west to Texas, I believe that concept could work there.

“But for the time being land holders are in the best position to trap on their own country.

“They know the land and they know where they have had dog problems.

“So, in many cases they just need to know a little more about setting traps.”

Mr Lincoln said Queensland was the only state where steel-jawed traps were still legal for dog-trapping. However, he said his preference was for rubber-jawed traps, which “held the animal better” and allowed for release if the “wrong” animal was caught.

He also recommended noose-style traps and a lure paste made from dog urine and anal glands.

The rise in bounty by the SDRC was just one of several proposals being pushed by landholders keen to combat the wild dog problem.

AgForce president Brent Finlay, who chairs the state wild dog committee, said a whole-shire approach using a range of control measures was critical to removing the wild dog problem.

To contact Mr Lincoln, email gettrapped@optusnet.com.au or call 0421 630945.

Growing issue

Wild dogs are now 25% bigger than they were 30 years ago

On average they weigh 17.5kg

Wild dogs breed twice per year, dingoes breed once

Source: Australian Invasive Animals Co-operative Research Centre


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