Reilly is recovering from surgery with the help of his mother Jenene Moore, who said Warwick Hospital staff refused to remove a sewing needle from his foot.
Reilly is recovering from surgery with the help of his mother Jenene Moore, who said Warwick Hospital staff refused to remove a sewing needle from his foot. Kerri Burns-Taylor

Warwick mum slams hospital

A WARWICK mother has lashed out at Warwick Hospital staff after her autistic son was sent home without treatment and with a sewing needle still embedded in his foot.

Jenene Moore took her 14-year-old son Reilly Fraser King to the emergency department of the Warwick Hospital last week after she woke to find cotton dangling from his foot and the needle inside.

Ms Moore said she was unsure of how it happened but tried to remove it before seeking help.

"I tried a couple of times to get it out and by that time he was hysterical and I decided we would just go up to the hospital," she said.

After arriving at hospital Reilly became frustrated at the pain in his foot and began to bite his arm.

Ms Moore said she asked nurses if her son could be sedated for treatment but was told sedating patients was only done in emergencies

The woman said her son's autism was the reason he was not treated.

"He was agitated and I think they just didn't know how to deal with him and thought it was too hard," she said.

"They didn't even call a doctor. It was 4.30 in the afternoon, there would have been a doctor there."

After walking on his foot for a day and a half, Reilly was taken to a private doctor who diagnosed an infection and directed Ms Moore to take him to Toowoomba immediately.

Ms Moore said she couldn't believe the difference in the way she was treated in Toowoomba and said the entire staff were "brilliant".

That night Reilly was put under general anaesthetic to remove the item.

Ms Moore said doctors had trouble locating the needle during the procedure, as it had travelled inside his foot and wedged itself into a tendon.

She said what was meant to be a one-hour procedure turned into two hours and Reilly's foot had to be cut at both the bottom and top to find the needle.

After Reilly's rough experience, Ms Moore visited the hospital to speak with the acting director of nursing but she said she was met with a "patronising and condescending" manner.

"I was just so frustrated because this woman just thought it was a joke -it's not a joke, it's my son," she said.

"She never said sorry and the second sentence she said to me was 'next time it happens you should come and see me'," she said.

Ms Moore said she wanted to share her story so that this didn't happen to anyone else.

"I just want people to know this goes on and to tell people to go with their own instincts and not take the crap."

Darling Downs Health Service District's acting chief executive officer Dr Peter Bristow stood by the actions of the nurses on duty at the time of the incident.

"We have examined records for this case and believe no corrective action is required," he said.


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