Alan Jones used an offensive phrase containing the N word live on radio in Sydney this morning. Picture: AAP
Alan Jones used an offensive phrase containing the N word live on radio in Sydney this morning. Picture: AAP

Alan Jones drops the N-word on air

DO not adjust your radios - Alan Jones really did just use the N word live on air.

The controversial 2GB Sydney breakfast host was speaking about the leadership saga in Canberra when he used an offensive phrase.

It sparked immediate outrage on social media and calls for people to boycott advertisers on the top-rating program.

"They are mobilising to block Dutton," Mr Jones said.

"The n****r in the woodpile here, if I can use that expression, and I'm not going to yield to certain people who tell us that words in the language are forbidden, the person who's playing hard to get, is Matthias Cormann."

 

Right after using the phrase, Alan Jones said he wouldn’t “yield” to critics of the word. Picture: Chris Pavlich
Right after using the phrase, Alan Jones said he wouldn’t “yield” to critics of the word. Picture: Chris Pavlich

 

The phrase originated in America's deep south in the 19th Century and was used to describe slaves who had fled their captors.

Escapees were said to have hidden in piles of firewood while travelling north to Canada. In a modern context, it is almost universally considered racist and hurtful.

A British politician who used the phrase in parliament 10 years ago faced furore and was called on to resign, before issuing a grovelling apology.

 

It’s not the first time Alan Jones has attracted controversy.
It’s not the first time Alan Jones has attracted controversy.

 

Users on Twitter described Mr Jones' remarks as "disgusting" and "disgraceful", saying he should be sacked or seriously sanctioned.

Mr Jones has apparently used the term on previous occasions and also refused to apologise for it. He uttered it during an interview with Tony Abbott in 2012.

Macquarie Media Limited, which owns the 2GB station, has been approached for comment.

It's not the first time the firebrand shock jock has attracted controversy.

He was forced to apologise after being caught on tape at a Young Liberals fundraiser in 2012 saying then-Prime Minister Julia Gillard's father had "died of shame".

That same year, Mr Jones also issued an apology for describing Lebanese people as "vermin" and "mongrels".

The veteran broadcaster is currently being sued by the Wagner family, a prominent agricultural dynasty in Queensland, over comments he made in dozens of broadcasts in 2014 and 2015.


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