PREPARED: The team from the Stanthorpe Fire Station are on standby if neighbourhood fireys need assistance.
PREPARED: The team from the Stanthorpe Fire Station are on standby if neighbourhood fireys need assistance.

Stanthorpe fireys on standby as neighbouring regions ignite

ALMOST 100,000 hectares and 19 homes have been destroyed in Queensland since the start of September, with 2000 bushfires burning since then.

Firefighters are on high alert with fires currently burning in the neighbourhood regions of Rivertree, Tenterfield, Torrington and Glen Innes.

Stanthorpe Fire Station officer in-charge, Ian Barnden said his team are on standby if they are needed to be called in for assistance.

“We’ve got the trucks here ready to go if something does happen,” officer in-charge Mr Barnden said.

As for now, the team from the Stanthorpe Fire Station are doing their best to prepare the town in the case of a fire emergency.

“There are campaigns to make sure all the preparation that can be done has been done and to make people aware how critical it is,” Mr Barnden said.

As for the current fires and what caused them, Sugarloaf Rural Fire Service first officer James Massey, said it was a combination of high fuel loads and dry weather that had led to what he described as “catastrophic” fires.

“We have got fuel loads of 100 tonnes to the hectare and situations where the country hasn’t been burnt for 30-40 years,” he said.

“Wind isn’t helping but part of the reason there’s so much wind is because the ground is so hot, which creates fires, and fire creates its own wind.

“What also comes into it is that we have so little water at the moment, which makes it extremely hard out there firefighting,” said Mr Massey.

Stanthorpe Border Post

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