News

Scientist wants to release more cane toads: Wins top award

A SCIENTIST who wants to release small cane toads in areas where the pest is yet to arrive has taken out the $250,000 Prime Minister's Award for Science. 

Professor Richard Shine, originally from Brisbane, has been awarded the honour in recognition of his work in ensuring northern Australia's peak predators - snakes and lizards - survive the cane-toad invasion. 

Professor Shine has created traps for cane toads, taught quolls and goannas to avoid toads, and now plans to release small cane toads ahead of their potential arrival in new areas so predators survive their first meal of cane toad but have an aversion to eating them again. 

Another award recipient, announced tonight was Professor Michael Aitken who took out the $250,000 Prime Minister's Prize for Innovation. 

His researchers have developed a spin-off company that is targeting health and other markets and identifying billion dollar frauds and inefficiencies in Australia's health markets.  

Winner of the inaugural $50,000 Prime Minister's Prize for New Innovators, Dr Colin Hall, a Senior Research Fellow at the Future Industries Institute at the University of South Australia, is creating jobs and exports through new car part technologies.

The innovation awards recognise outstanding researchers who have turned scientific research into a direct benefit to Australia's economy, driving innovation and helping Australian industry thrive in a changing world.

Other Prime Minister's Prizes for Science winners were:

Associate Professor Kerrie Wilson of the University of Queensland is using economics and maths to protect tropical forests, and guide bush renewal, and receives the $50,000 Frank Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year.

Professor Richard Payne of the University of Sydney is reengineering proteins from nature to fight TB, malaria, stroke, and cancer, and receives the $50,000 Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year.

Miss Suzanne Urbaniak from Perth is turning students on to geoscience, and receives the $50,000 Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools.

Mr Gary Tilley from Sydney is bringing science into the next generation of primary school classrooms, and receives the $50,000 Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Primary Schools.

As the calibre of these prize recipients demonstrates, this is an exciting time for science in Australia.

The work that is happening in labs, universities and institutions now will position us to succeed in the years, decades and generations to come.

Scientists' work improves our understanding of the world around us, helping to tackle issues that confront our country in medicine, conservation, trade industry and many other areas.

We also rely upon outstanding science teachers open the eyes of the next generations to the value of science, enabling them to make decisions in their lives based on evidence and scientific principles. 

Topics:  cane toads editors picks more brothers than brothers release richard shine


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

GALLERY: Junior cricketers enjoy final games for the year

Stanthorpe Junior Cricket, Saturday December 3, 2016.

Stanthorpe Junior Cricket kicked play off early on Saturday.

'Eleventh hour' backpacker tax decision welcomed

SHE'S APPLES: Rosie Savio welcomed the backpacker tax decision.

Granite Belt growers have welcomed the backpacker tax resolution.

Speculation discovered body could be missing man

Jamie Hardgraves, 43, was last seen at Thiedke Road, Beaudesert on Tuesday May 17. His vehicle was later located abandoned on Stanthorpe Texas Road early on May 18.

Police are unable to identify the remains until testing is finished.

Local Partners

Mandy Moore feels like she's 60

Mandy Moore sees herself as a 60-year-old rather than a 32-year-old

Goooodbye Hamish and Andy (from our radios)

Hamish and Andy

The pair have been on air since 2006

David Attenborough on facing his mortality

Sir David Attenborough in a scene from the TV special The Death of the Oceans.

Life without Sir David Attenborough is hard to imagine

Saying "I do" changed Shia's outlook on marriage

Shia LaBeouf has a new outlook on marriage since he tied the knot.

Singer tunes in to first movie role

Tori Kelly voices the character Meena in the movie Sing.

Musician Tori Kelly voices Meena the teenage elephant in Sing

Cricketing greats bring Aussie mateship to commentary box

Cricket commentator Adam Gilchrist.

ADAM Gilchrist enjoys the fun of calling the Big Bash League.

Chinese locked out of Australian property market

The rules are different if you're a foreigner

The buyer was from China - the trouble started right there

Morrison signs off on new affordable rental model

Australia's Treasurer Scott Morrison speaks during a press conference after a meeting of the Council of Federal Financial Relations at Parliament House in Canberra, Friday, Dec. 2, 2016.

Scott Morrison signed off on development of a new financing model

Evicted from their own land: red tape tangles up family's plans

HOME WOES: Carl Murray says his family was evicted from their own property.

Owning their own land wasn't the biggest hurdle for this family

Coast high-flyer's fight back from bankruptcy, $72m debt

Scott Juniper went from millionaire developer to declaring bankruptcy in2012, now he is back on top of his game again with new developments including this one in Coolum.

'Apocalyptic lending storm' causes financial collapse.

Ready to SELL your property?

Post Your Ad Here!