SOCIAL LIFE: Edwin Welsh takes a break from helping out at his favourite spot, the Warwick Bowls Club.
SOCIAL LIFE: Edwin Welsh takes a break from helping out at his favourite spot, the Warwick Bowls Club. Jonno Colfs

Scare forces change of lifestyle for Warwick farmer

THE family farm on Pikedale Rd south of Warwick was home and life for Edwin Welsh, until a heart attack 17 years ago forced a change of lifestyle.

Drenching sheep one day on the farm, Mr Welsh started suffering from a sharp pain in the chest that wouldn't go away.

After a struggle to find a decent mobile signal, he was able to dial 000 and his wife Delsie, who rushed him to meet the ambulance on the way into Warwick.

"I had my first helicopter ride that day,” Mr Welsh said.

"In the CareFlight (now LifeFlight) chopper to the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane, but I couldn't see out the windows unfortunately.”

After this scare, Mr Welsh was told to start taking it easier and, in 2009, he and Delsie made the move into town.

"We've got a beautiful spot in east Warwick,” he said.

"When people ask me how I go living in the city, I tell them, when I look out my back door, all I see is farms anyway.

"It's a great spot and we have wonderful neighbours, which makes all the difference.”

To pass the time and make new friends, Mr Welsh joined the Warwick Bowls Club.

"I knew a few bushy mates that played there, so I came along,” he said. "There's always plenty to be done around here and I end up coming down a few times a week to help out.

"We have no greenkeeper and we're all volunteers, so we chip and look after the green and general maintenance that needs to be done.”

Mr Welsh, who is also a Warwick Show Society life member, said the bowls club had been a great source of new friends. "It's that social outlet that you need in life,” he said.

"When we moved to town, if I'd just sat around and watched TV, I probably wouldn't still be here today.”

Everyday life in the district is a far cry from Mr Welsh's early years. "I did primary school by correspondence in the early 1940s,” he said. "There were no school buses running out there at the time.”


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