DAWN SERVICE: (from left) St Joseph’s school leaders Stephanie Wilmot, Peter Gasparin and Emma Boccari about to lay a wreath.
DAWN SERVICE: (from left) St Joseph’s school leaders Stephanie Wilmot, Peter Gasparin and Emma Boccari about to lay a wreath.

Record numbers at services

IT WAS a cold morning as residents woke for the Dawn Service in Stanthorpe.

But they came in droves to Weeroona Park to honour the fallen and mark 97 years since the Anzac legend was born.

Co-ordinator for Stanthorpe Anzac Day services on behalf of the Southern Downs Regional Council Greg Thouard said the day went off without a hitch.

He said crowd numbers were up across all services and Stanthorpe should be proud.

"Stanthorpe once again did not disappoint the community," Mr Thouard said.

"The crowds at the Dawn Service were beyond expectations.

"They (organisers) are saying it's the biggest crowd they have seen."

And they didn't skip the parade either. Marchers stretched from Carnarvon Bridge to Victoria St at one stage, as community groups, organisations and individuals made their way to Weeroona Park.

The number of children at all services around town was exceptional, a feat that could be attributed to the RSL according to Mr Thouard.

"We attribute that to the major promotion the RSL had this week, there were two full days of kids just streaming through the RSL looking at the stuff," he said.

"Each of those kids would have gone home and told mum and dad about it."

Mr Thouard said the future of Anzac Day depended on the involvement of the children.

"I think it's vitally important, if Anzac Day is to survive the kids of today have to be the marchers of the future," he said.

Having heard the somewhat unique stories of his father's time during the Battle of The Somme in France in the First World War and his time during the Second World War, Mr Thouard said Anzac Day always hit close to home.

"My father put his age down and fought for the English in World War One, he was 17-years-old," he said.

"He was one of the lucky ones to survive. After that he came to Australia and fought for Australia in the Second World War.

"I guess it's a commemoration of a person who gave his life to the army and one of the very few people who fought in both world wars for two counties."

Stanthorpe Border Post

IN TOUCH: Rural residents given new voice

Premium Content IN TOUCH: Rural residents given new voice

Potential library relocation, new waste management plan, and more are on the cards...

Dad inspired to dig deep by own son’s health battle

Premium Content Dad inspired to dig deep by own son’s health battle

‘It’s one of those things you don’t need until you do and my God, you really...

Fatal levels of nicotine in Queensland vapes

Premium Content Fatal levels of nicotine in Queensland vapes

Poisons lines inundated with calls about nicotine poisoning from vapers