New bridge on council agenda

KITAL Road Bridge was back on the agenda at yesterday's engineering services committee meeting with councillors resolving to forge ahead with designs and costs to replace the present infrastructure.

A two-part resolution was passed at the October round of meetings to further investigate environmental restrictions placed on rebuilding the bridge because of the need for a fish passage through the waterway.

Engineering Services director Peter See said he had looked after the first part of the motion by meeting with Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation officers.

Mr See said there would not have to be a study into the fish but anecdotal evidence would be collected.

The bridge was initially meant for the scrap heap but after residents protested it was granted a last minute stay of execution and $350,000 was later allocated in the budget to replace it.

But environmental restrictions meant more cost effective options were not available to the council with the cost potentially blowing out to $500, 000.

The discussion raised more questions for Cr Vic Pennisi about the fate of the 30 timber bridges in the Warwick area which would all have to be replaced at some stage.

"We are going to be faced with this every time we are working on crossings anywhere within our region," he said.

Cr Ross Bartley suggested a study into the condition of the all of the timber bridges in the area and a possible replacement program.


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