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New app provides police with details in case of abduction

PARENTS have a new tool in their arsenal to protect their children against abduction, with a new smartphone application launched by the Australian Federal Police on Wednesday.

The new app lets parents save essential information about their child, including a photo, date of birth and nicknames, on their phone.

Parents can then send the information immediately to the authorities in the event their child goes missing.

The Australian Police Child ID app was developed with the help of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and will provide police with all the necessary information essential in the time immediately after an abduction.

AFP commissioner Tony Negus said the app would give police an "enhanced ability" to find missing children and get them out of potentially dangerous situations.

The app is available free for all iPhone and Android users, and can be downloaded from most app stores.

It also include safety advice for parents, checklists, and emergency contact phone numbers.

Neither the FBI, AFP nor iTunes will collect or store any photos of information stored in the app - all data stays on the phone until you send it to authorities.

Topics:  abduction app fbi smartphone


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