Darryl Charles and Mayor Ron Bellingham cut the cake to commemorate NAIDOC Week.
Darryl Charles and Mayor Ron Bellingham cut the cake to commemorate NAIDOC Week.

NAIDOC celebrations continue

THE Wednesday NAIDOC celebrations in front of the town hall was an opportunity for the Southern Downs Regional Council to recognise what the Aboriginal community means to their community in Warwick.

Leroy Brown started the proceedings by filling the busy town square with sounds of his didgeridoo.

Mayor Ron Bellingham spoke of the significance of NAIDOC week to the council and the community and Darryl Charles discussed the history of the indigenous rights in Australia and how they have evolved throughout recent time.

Mr Charles expressed the need to maintain equality among all Australians as one people.

Sharmon Parsons performed an indigenous dance, which depicted the story of a small bird dancing in the tree tops, celebrating the end of the winter Dreaming.

Key organiser of the event Pam Burley said it was important to recognise the indigenous community in the region.

“It’s a chance for the Southern Downs Regional Council to express their unity with indigenous cultures,” she said.

Randall McIntosh, who attended Monday’s flag-raising ceremony as well as Wednesday’s event, said while NAIDOC was great for the community, more practical initiatives needed to be put in place after the week’s celebrations.

“We’ve got to stop talking the talk, and start walking the walk,” he said.

“Elders need to find a way of regrouping; to sit down and look at this division and form a chemistry of working together and moving on as one people.

“United we stand, divided we fall.”

The local festivities of NAIDOC Week will continue through until tomorrow.


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