STAR STUDENTS: Scots PGC College agriculture students Bridget Christensen and Briar Densley were proud to represent their school at the Clifton Show with their heifers Wonder Woman and Mini.
STAR STUDENTS: Scots PGC College agriculture students Bridget Christensen and Briar Densley were proud to represent their school at the Clifton Show with their heifers Wonder Woman and Mini. Marian Faa

Loving care for cattle pays off for Warwick students

WHILE some kids were off having fun on the dodgem cars at the Clifton Show, others had more serious business to attend to.

Students from the Scots PGC College Agriculture School attended their first show competition of the year and were already seeing results from all the hard work and tender loving care they put into their animals.

Scots PGC show team captain Bridget Christensen and fellow student Briar Densley both won ribbons for their cattle in the led heifers' section.

Briar's six-month-old angus-limousin heifer Mini took out top place with a beautiful black hide and good carcass condition.

"She's got a good fat cover and a decent amount of muscle,” Briar said.

Originally from East Greenmount, Briar has been showing cattle since she was nine years old, and has given all her animals a lot of love - brushing, grooming and breaking them in - for the past four weeks.

She said it was good to compete against people from all around the district.

Bridget's heifer Wonder Woman was awarded third place in the led heifers, with her beautiful droughtmaster- limousin traits impressing the judges.

"I come off a big property near Avocavale, so I just love being around cattle,” Bridget said.

Her dream is to win the Ekka paraders, and she'll be working her way towards the big Brisbane event later in the year.

Bridget and Briar will both be showing their heifers at the Killarney Show this coming weekend.

But while some students were taking out prizes in the arena, others were gaining gold in the kitchen.

Eleven-year-old Ned Murry from Greenmount was proud as punch after winning first place for his delicious sponge cake and scrumptious scones in the junior baking section.

Perfecting a spongy consistency meant a lot of sifting for Ned, who is considered a natural in the kitchen.

"He's always helped me since he was little.

"He would be standing on the step at the kitchen bench wanting to help out,” Ned's mother Rebecca said.

Ned's worked his way up to independence and has entered the cooking competition for the second year in a row.

And the secret to his scones? A little bit of rustic charm, he says.

"I think (I came first) because I didn't use a scone-cutter, I just used a cup so they didn't look too beautiful, they looked more handmade,” he said.

Ned used a recipe from his mother's Grade 8 home economics book, so you could say it's a tried-and-tested winner.


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