Villa Carramar personal care worker Melinda Wood.
Villa Carramar personal care worker Melinda Wood.

Heroes of the pandemic: ‘I learned I had power to make a difference’

SOME people are still required to go to work during this national shutdown.

We’re speaking with essential workers to hear how their jobs have changed and how they’re keeping things turning on the Granite Belt.

We want to bring you their stories.

DESPITE only being relatively new to the aged care sector a Villa Carramar employee has remained a beacon of positivity throughout the COVID-19 crisis.

Melinda Wood, is one of the many healthcare professionals providing critical care in Stanthorpe during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ms Wood said the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the healthcare industry has only heightened her enthusiasm and commitment to becoming a registered nurse.

Caring is ingrained in Melinda’s DNA, whose brother Andrew Myors, is an Endorsed Enrolled Nurse at Stanthorpe Hospital.

“I watched my brother care for our parents full time,” Ms Wood said.

“Seeing him devote his life to caring for people inspired me to travel down a similar path.

“When we were hit hard financially by the ongoing drought and a personal care worker position at Stanthorpe Aged Care Service (Villa Carramar) opened, it was almost like destiny,” Ms Wood said.

In mid-2019, Ms Wood, also a mother of four, enrolled to study a Bachelor of Nursing with the University of Southern Queensland.

“I have learnt so much from the people in our care. Older people are quite aware of themselves and their health care needs.

“I learned to be present; to pay attention even when attending their daily routine. I learned that I had power to make a difference,” Ms Wood said.

“Nursing is a beautiful profession and as a carer I have the privilege of being present during some of life’s most precious moments.”

Now in her second semester of tertiary education, Ms Wood intends to continue her study.

“I have a great group of supportive colleagues who are always willing to answer my questions and share their knowledge.”

Ms Wood said she has a particular passion for supporting people living with dementia and would like to further her nursing career in the dementia care field.

She was last year’s recipient of the Beryl Wiltshire Scholarship.

Supported by her employers, Churches of Christ in Queensland, the scholarship is designed to meet the tuition and associated costs for a person wishing to embark on a career of service within the social, welfare, human services and caring sectors.

Do you know someone who has become a frontline essential worker? Let us know by emailing editor@borderpost.com.au

Stanthorpe Border Post

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