The Leyburn Sprints barriers continue to frustrate residents.
The Leyburn Sprints barriers continue to frustrate residents. Contributed

Eyesores still hurt town

THE fate of the controversial Leyburn Sprints concrete barriers could be decided next month - and resident Cindy Dowdle hopes it will be the last she sees of them - at least until the race meet.

"I really like the sprints, I really think they bring something to the community," she said.

"But around the track, especially where they are two barriers deep, they are really ugly and overgrown.

"We moved here thinking it was a pretty place."

Mrs Dowdle said she was concerned about what would happen if the sprints folded for some reason.

"Who is going to move them then, as a ratepayer I don't want to pay that amount of money," she said.

"I have had my accountant and other people from Brisbane come here and say 'what is going on?' and they are shocked they are still here.

"If they want to use them on the (Leyburn Sprints) weekends, they need to pack them up and put them away."

Recently council sent a survey out to Leyburn residents to gauge the community's feeling about the barriers and at last week's general meeting Engineering Services Director Peter See said he was compiling a report to present next month.

He said the response rate was about 50% which was "outstanding" considering council usually had a 10% response rate.

"In my conclusion one thing I have said there is two types of opinions to do with this and they are poles apart," Mr See said.

"And my recommendation is that it is up to the councillors to decide what they want to do with it."

But Mrs Dowdle said there were even issues with the survey which was addressed "to the householder" and resulted in many being mistaken for junk mail. Others got delivered to houses in the Toowoomba Regional Council area.

Leyburn Sprints president Ann Collins said she and the committee were interested in the outcome of the survey.

"We want to do the right thing by the community and we realise how valuable the sprints is to the community," she said.

"One of the biggest issues we face is it decided we have to remove them after the event, it will be a very costly exercise and it would be too expensive. We wouldn't be able to do it."

She said the barriers that had been painted with murals were an asset to the community and the artist intended to continue with more.

Mrs Collins said they would ask other people to submit designs.

"We want to include the community and they can come forward with ideas to go on some of the barriers," she said.


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