RAIN ON THE HORIZON: Horticulturalists on the Granite Belt aren’t getting their hopes up for heavy rainfall despite the declaration of the La Nina.
RAIN ON THE HORIZON: Horticulturalists on the Granite Belt aren’t getting their hopes up for heavy rainfall despite the declaration of the La Nina.

EYES ON SKY: La Nina’s impact for growers

LA NINA has officially been declared and heavy rain is predicted but it’s a prospect some on the Granite Belt aren’t too excited for just yet.

The Bureau of Meteorology declared the weather event for northern and eastern Australia yesterday, signalling the likelihood of increased rainfall.

It’s a declaration Granite Belt Growers Association president Angus Ferrier isn’t hanging too many of his hopes on.

“It’s no means a guarantee of a good season but from where we have come from it’s a welcome forecast,” Mr Ferrier said.

“People shouldn’t be taking it as a promise of more rain, it’s just an increased probability of more rainfall.

“Until the rain has actually happened, I wouldn’t presume anything.”

Granite Belt Growers Association president Angus Ferrier said the La Nina was only a 70 per cent chance of rain, leaving 30 per cent chance for none.
Granite Belt Growers Association president Angus Ferrier said the La Nina was only a 70 per cent chance of rain, leaving 30 per cent chance for none.

The last significant La Nina event was in 2011 to 2012, which saw significant flooding through parts of the Darling Downs and Brisbane.

Meteorologist Rosa Hoff said the La Nina was likely to have its biggest influence during the spring months.

“It is indicating to be a moderate to strong La Nina event but we are expecting to see a notable impact from it,” Ms Hoff said.

Mr Ferrier said if significant rainfall did arrive, it could change a grower’s yearly outlook.

“For our tree crop guys, it’ll provide an instant reprieve to irrigate trees and any current concerns for the lack of water for the season,” he said.

“For our veggie growers, from the day of rainfall, they can be planting more veggies in six to eight weeks.

“For horticulturalists, our situation can change drastically and rapidly on the back of one big rainfall; and we do have time to have a productive summer season.”

MORE STANTHORPE STORIES:

PAY IT FORWARD: Inspiring initiative to help community

$20K ‘bugger all’ for skatepark Stanthorpe wants

REVEALED: Plumbing showroom’s new milestone

TOURISM BOOM: Stanthorpe’s new crown

ACTION: Southern Downs to star in small screen feature

Stanthorpe Border Post

IN TOUCH: Rural residents given new voice

Premium Content IN TOUCH: Rural residents given new voice

Potential library relocation, new waste management plan, and more are on the cards...

Dad inspired to dig deep by own son’s health battle

Premium Content Dad inspired to dig deep by own son’s health battle

‘It’s one of those things you don’t need until you do and my God, you really...

Fatal levels of nicotine in Queensland vapes

Premium Content Fatal levels of nicotine in Queensland vapes

Poisons lines inundated with calls about nicotine poisoning from vapers