ART ENTHUSIASTS REJOICE: Warwick mosaics and digital artist Christolphe Hulme is excited to bring art hobbyists into the region for CCART.
ART ENTHUSIASTS REJOICE: Warwick mosaics and digital artist Christolphe Hulme is excited to bring art hobbyists into the region for CCART.

Everything you need to know about this art and craft trail

ARTISTS from across Warwick and surrounds are busily turning the region into an artistic oasis before the first Condamine Country Art and Craft Trail arrives this weekend.

Working in tandem with GBART, the trail is our own interactive tourist map of studios, galleries and collectives.

 

CCART MAP / CREDIT: Warwick Art Gallery
CCART MAP / CREDIT: Warwick Art Gallery

 

Warwick Art Gallery director and organiser of the event Karina Devine said she was hoping to see at least 100 visitors trawl through over 10 art spaces across the region this weekend.

Not only a rare chance to explore the inner workings of artists' space, it will also give cultural tourism a much-needed boost.

"Its not just about being an artist yourself, it's about having conversations and talking to the artist about what they do and why they live here," Ms Devine said.

"It's about promoting the region as much as about promoting the art.

"We included a lot of the smaller villages around the trail which we're excited about and I hope there's a lot of overflow into business from the visitors and even locals getting out and exploring."

 

Warwick mosaics and digital artist Christolphe Hulme recently finished his studio, just in time for the trail.
Warwick mosaics and digital artist Christolphe Hulme recently finished his studio, just in time for the trail.

 

One Warwick artist holding mosaic workshops over the weekend is Christopher Hulme.

An artist in residence with SOTE, Mr Hulme was "stoked" at the chance to share his art with a wider audience.

"It's really good to see the arts promoted in this way, particularly since the Covid situation we haven't had a lot of support," he said.

"It will encourage people to come to this area and have a look at what's happening."

With lockdown leading to a lot of people turning towards the arts, Mr Hulme was also hopeful to see a new-found appreciation for his craft.

"I think people have become more aware value of art. In lockdown, they watched movies and listened to music to get them through it," he said.

"But if it wasn't for artists, those things wouldn't be there."

For more information on how to book a workshop, head here.


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