Dutton considers changes for troubled Nauru centre

THE strife-torn Nauru immigration centre could face a major shake-up following a damning Senate inquiry report into abuse against women and children at the facility.

Describing the inquiry as a "witch hunt" dominated by the ALP and the Greens, Federal Immigration Minister Peter Dutton said on Tuesday he would consider the report's recommendations.

"We need to provide people with a dignified setting, we need to provide them with support and we don't tolerate any instances of sexual offences at all," Mr Dutton said.

"(I am) happy to consider any of the recommendations which provide for a better outcome for people."

The report said conditions at the facility in the Pacific were not "safe" for detainees - particularly women and children - and allegations of rape and abuse needed to be investigated. The inquiry also called for children and their families to be moved into the community and for human rights workers and journalists to gain access to the centre.

Greens' immigration spokeswoman Senator Sarah Hanson-Young urged Mr Dutton to act as soon as possible.

"The most horrific aspects of this inquiry really is the abuse of children, the sexual harassment and assault of women, and the fact that for months the government contractors have known this abuse is going on, yet these women and children have remained locked up inside the camp," Senator Hanson-Young said on Tuesday.

"The minister has acknowledged for the first time this morning that things are not okay inside the Nauru detention camp, but talk is cheap and the minister needs to act.

"There are a number of recommendations from this report that could be acted on immediately."

Topics:  immigration nauru peter dutton senate inquiry

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