Corellas line the paddocks near the Condamine River yesterday.
Corellas line the paddocks near the Condamine River yesterday. Emma Channon

Curse of corellas

FEEDING time brings thousands of corellas to Allman Park and with them, the unnerving sound of ear-piercing screeches.

Two hours later they are gone, leaving behind a blanket of white feathers - but surrounding residents know they'll be back again for lunch.

This has been the routine at the racetrack and other open spaces in Warwick this past week, since numbers of the pesky bird suddenly soared.

Turf Club president Jim Costello said it was a problem he didn't know how to tackle.

"We had an issue with them on Saturday with our last race - we had to hold it while we got the stewards car to drive down the course to shift them," he said.

"It's a bit like the bat problem - you probably can't shift them on, I would say they'd be protected. I don't know what you can do about them."

Mr Costello believed the corellas were feasting on the crop of grain in the middle of the track, and said the large flock might move on when it's harvested.

"I think we'll just have to sit out the plague," he said.

"We've had the problem for a few years but I don't think it has been numbers this big."

Corella flocks have also been bothering residents in south Warwick, with especially large numbers sighted at Stan Walsh Park.


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