Doctor Myrthe Runne died in a plane crash along with partner Dr Dan Rainolds.
Doctor Myrthe Runne died in a plane crash along with partner Dr Dan Rainolds. Supplied

Community remembers flying doctors

THE aviation and medical communities in Warwick have fondly remembered the two doctors who died in a tragic plane crash.

Dr Dan Rainolds, 48, and Myrthe Runne, 37, were killed instantly when their BD-4 plane crashed at Mundubbera on Wednesday.

The pair was known to travel with their work extensively, but their home base was at the caretaker's residence at Warwick Massie Aerodrome.

There, they were known to spend a few days break in between their two to three week contracts, and were active members of the local aviation club.

Queensland Recreational Aircraft Association (QRAA) president Kelvin Hutchinson remembered Dan and Myrthe as not just a good set of friends, but as outstanding doctors.

"They were both specialists in what they did," he said.

"(Myrthe's) speciality was prosthetic limbs; that was her love and expertise, as well as being a general practitioner.

"(Dan) did a lot of work at Bass Straight oil rigs where his speciality was deep diving related incidents."

Mr Rainolds had been a member of the club for a couple of years, while Ms Runne had moved out from Holland about three weeks ago, after getting approvals to live in the country.

Mr Hutchinson said both loved Australia, and in particular, Warwick.

"They loved being freelance and flying around - they loved that lifestyle," he said.

"That being said, they loved the area.

"Even though they could have travelled the world and the country, they always came back to Warwick."

It is believed Mr Rainolds had a son living on the Gold Coast, while Ms Runne's parents had both passed away in Holland.

Mr Hutchinson said he wasn't aware of any other family members both doctors left behind.

"Because they travelled a lot, they had a fairly close set of friends - they knew a lot of people but they were most close to the aviation people.

Warwick Medical Centre's Barbara Hannon said Mr Rainolds worked at the centre about three times between 2007-2008.

"When he was doing his locum he'd fly home to Brisbane at night and fly back the next day to start again," she said.

"He was quite a character; he loved flying."

Dr Chris Hannon, who worked alongside Mr Rainolds in those earlier years, said he was a "great doctor".


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