Brad Fittler's beloved New South Wales team looks in trouble

HIS beloved New South Wales team looks in trouble with suspension, injuries and form issues plaguing a number of key players.

But Blues legend and assistant coach Brad Fittler is still confident his side can start its series defence with a win for Origin I in Sydney on May 27.

Blues enforcer Greg Bird will miss the entire series through suspension, winger Brett Morris is injured with a hamstring injury, and incumbent five-eighth Josh Reynolds is also suspended for this weekend and down on form.

But Fittler still sees the glass half full for NSW, telling APN "I always think momentum is in our favour".

Fittler also refused to rule out Reynolds' chances, the Bulldogs No.6 missing his chance to impress against Cowboys and Queensland star playmaker Johnathan Thurston, for tonight's clash in Townsville.

Fittler added Blues coach Laurie Daley had not yet settled on a halves combination, despite the strong rumour that

Roosters halfback Mitchell Pearce was set for a return to the Origin arena.

"There are no standout (Blues) halves (putting their hands up to be picked)," he said.

"Reynolds is not ruled out."

Dragons fullback Josh Dugan could yet back up from a knee injury he picked up in last weekend's Anzac Test, against South Sydney on Monday night.

But Fittler believes the Blues have good fullback depth, saying star young custodians Matt Moylan and James Tedesco "have to be ready" if called to debut for NSW this year.


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