BOTTOMS UP: Granite Belt Brewery's Geoff Davenport said experimenting with flavours kept his passion for beer up.
BOTTOMS UP: Granite Belt Brewery's Geoff Davenport said experimenting with flavours kept his passion for beer up.

BOTTOMS UP: Brewers‘ secret to perfect beer

DRAWN together by the love of beer, Granite Belt brewers are eager to continue pushing the boundaries on the iconic beverage.

Experimenting with flavours and brewing techniques, brewers say the opportunity to craft unique or traditional brews keeps their customers coming back for more.

According to Brass Monkey Brew House brewer Ernie Butler, there is just core ingredient to make a perfect beer.

“Fresh ingredients; we use fresh local hops, non-filtering and no preservatives,” Mr Butler said.

As the smallest brewery in Queensland, Mr Butler said he had the freedom to craft beers to his tastebuds, from Indian Pale Ales to English Brown Ales.

While no one beer sells better than the other, he said customers ‘froth’ the opportunity to sample the seven tap beers throughout the year.

“There is never a bad time to drink beer, you can drink beer all year round,” he said.

“Different beer is designed for different months of the year; lager and pilsners in the summer and ales in the winter.”

Brass Monkey Brew House brewer Ernie Butler said his mood drives his brew choices, from German ales to IPLs.
Brass Monkey Brew House brewer Ernie Butler said his mood drives his brew choices, from German ales to IPLs.

For Granite Belt Brewery owner Geoff Davenport, the chance to push the boundaries makes the job more interesting.

“At the moment, we have 10 beers on tap, we’ve got our normal six core beers and four seasonals,” Mr Davenport said.

“A pumpkin ale, pear and ginger, and merlot sour (beer aged and soured in a merlot wine barrel).”

On a day to celebrate all things beer, Mr Davenport said the brewery had made more than 2000 litres of beer this week.

With the Irish Red Ale a personal favourite, he said the addition to crafting brews was only growing.

“Just looking for a balance of flavour; hops brings in the bitterness and the malt gives you one of the core flavours,” he said.

“Getting a balance between them, when you get them balanced, it’s a lovely beer.”

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